Impressionist Watercolor Class (Part 7)

We continued painting white objects, adding more objects to make the scene more complex. Here we were presented with apples and a green bowl in addition to the white pitcher. A photo of the set-up:

Set-up with a bowl, pitcher, and apples
Set-up with a bowl, pitcher, and apples

I decided to paint a part of the scene in a small format before embarking on a larger painting, as we would be given two weeks with the same still life set-up.

Pitcher, Bowl and Apple, watercolor, 5" x 7"
Pitcher, Bowl and Apple, watercolor, 5″ x 7″

Lee Boynton spoke at length about putting down information with boldness, knowledge, and single-minded clarity – in an unrehearsed manner. All of which comes about by practice and conviction.

Pitcher, Bowl, and Apples, watercolor, 9" x 12"
Pitcher, Bowl, and Apples, watercolor, 9″ x 12″

In our last class, I painted the whole set-up. The lights are warm and sunny, although I seem to be getting the warmth on the tablecloth better with the smaller paintings. The shadows are dark enough to read as shadows, yet contain reflective lights. I was about to go back in to darken the background cloth, but Lee stopped me and advised me to let all of the painting dry and then evaluate. So, to keep myself busy for the last fifteen minutes of class, I turned to another set-up to paint the red bowl and clementines. This is as far as I got:

Red Bowl and Clementine(s), watercolor, 5" x 7"
Red Bowl and Clementine(s), watercolor, 5″ x 7″

4 thoughts on “Impressionist Watercolor Class (Part 7)

  1. Ruth, even your unfinished painting is instructive, if not even more so. I can see, now, how you provide for the image of the orange by not painting there. Did you do all the shadow, first, or did you begin with the red bowl?

    • I first made a light pencil sketch of the outlines of the bowl and the clementines, and then separated the light areas from the shadow areas with a pencil line. The first paint to go down went on the most obvious light statement, here the inside of the bowl in the light. From there, I painted from one adjacent area to another – the shadow on the inside of the bowl, the light on the outside of the bowl, the shadow side of the outside of the bowl, the light on the clementine, the shadow side of the clementine, the clementine’s shadow on the table, the bowl’s shadow.

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